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March 13th, 2001

32 Megs on a Floppy

32 Megs on a Floppy

Those old 3.5″ disks you have may turn out to be more valuable than you thought.

According to IDG, it won’t be long before an inexpensive (< $100) drive is available that will be able to squeeze up to 32 megs of storage out of a regular 3.5" floppy disk (which can normally hold only 1.44 megabytes). I won't bother to get into the technical details, but this would be quite an advancement. The media is super-cheap and the hardware itself isn't much of an investment, considering the storage you get. I have several boxes of 3.5" disks from a "free after rebate" sale that CompUSA had a few years back, and I certainly wouldn't mind backing up some of my data. Of course, this new piece of hardware requires a USB port, but that's beside the point.

I think this might be just the thing to hold us over until we all have 10 terabyte drives on our PCs. -ram

Posted in Technology

FROM: liz
DATE: Tuesday March 13, 2001 -- 4:44:05AM
wait, get into the technical details! i completely don't understand how that would work.

FROM: Tina
DATE: Tuesday March 13, 2001 -- 8:37:24AM
Yeah, what happened to the Pings I actually understood?

FROM: Patrick
DATE: Tuesday March 13, 2001 -- 9:41:44AM

The 10TB 'thingies' seem possible, but the means of storage is not the hard and fast method we are all accustomed to. They use a compression algorithm that squeezes the bits down to 1/8th their original size. The compression coupled with a solid state memory allows them to theoreitcally get the 10TB in the size of a credit card.

FROM: Terry M.
DATE: Tuesday March 13, 2001 -- 10:29:06AM
I'd trust my data to be written in smoke signals during a tornado better than overclocked 3.5" disks. Those things had a failure rate of 10% out of the box when used within spec. I have very bad memories of backing up my data on those things (it took about 100), and at least one would always go bad when trying to restore.

As for the 10TB solid-state "drives": obviously a hoax. 8:1 compression for general data is a pipedream, but if we are to believe that you can hold 1.25TB in 6 sqaure inches, that's an increase of about a magnitude of about 5 over current technology. The potential yield of something like that is frightening, and the massive amount of time it would take to even run a suite of test vectors, clearly makes it unmanufacturable. I hope to be proven wrong, though - we really need some compelling reason for people to buy new computers, and this would be great for that.

FROM: Patrick
DATE: Tuesday March 13, 2001 -- 12:41:53PM
Scratch what I said about the 8x compression, I jumbled the numbers after reading them. The claim is that the technologies allow for a 4x compression and an 8x increase in the capacity of current memory modules. Frankly the more I read that press release the more it seems contradictory. Maybe it is a hoax.

DATE: Saturday January 1, 2005 -- 3:12:40 pm

Paul October 28, 2010, 2:47 am

Wow, 32 whole megs!

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