The Daily Ping

The 10,000th Ping will be published on May 24, 2027. Paul will be just about 50 years old.

May 6th, 2002

In Defense of Bread Crust

Nearly a year ago, Smuckers introduced Uncrustables – a readymade PB&J sandwich with the crusts removed. Now, Sara Lee has introduced a bread without crust. It costs about 75 cents more per loaf than Bread Classic, and their market research shows that people are willing to pay for this.

I want to come out and say that I really do enjoy bread crust. While there is something to be said for the chewy goodness of the non-crust area, the crust is there to provide something very necessary to a good bread: balance. Without the crust, offering slightly hard and slightly chewy textures, bread becomes totally soft. It loses all sense of challenge. Bread goes from a complex mixture of sensations to just one basic, generic taste. Has the position of bread in our society diminished so much that we’re willing to forgo a “good” bread, and parts of a good bread, just so we can simplify things?

The other issue, similar to my problem with Uncrustables, is that this provides a time-saving device that seems rather silly to me. Making a PB&J sandwich and removing the crusts would take no more than 10 minutes, on a bad day. Taking a few slices of bread and removing crusts takes a minute or two. At worst. But apparently, 2 minutes are worth 75 cents to some people.

It’s disappointing. Bread crust is good. Let’s ensure that our children, and our children’s children, know what a good loaf of bread is all about. I’m Paul, I’m pro-crust, and I’m not ashamed to admit it.

Posted in Food and Beverage

FROM: Ryan
DATE: Monday May 6, 2002 -- 12:57:44 am
I'll be the first to say that the market research is full of crap and the decrusted bread will not last long.



FROM: Matt
DATE: Tuesday May 7, 2002 -- 12:27:32 am
What are you supposed to hold the sandwich by? The bread would get all soggy if it was crustless.



FROM: me
DATE: Thursday May 9, 2002 -- 12:39:11 pm
that would totally take all the fun out of biting all the crust off first, leading to eating a sandwhich taking less time, which means that we would eat More sandwhiches, which of course leads to america, followed by the whole world weighing well over 1000 lbs each, leading to the end of sex (reproduction) and the end of the human race! aaaahhhhhhhhh



FROM: Alan Gee
DATE: Thursday May 23, 2002 -- 8:06:03 pm
I'm a fan of the bread with crust, but while were on the whole sandwich issue, have you ever tried Goober Grape????? Oh it is god! That's right, not good, GOD!!! Peanut butter and jelly in the same jar!!! Get some. Then tell me they shouldn't make Goober strawberry.



FROM: King Random
DATE: Monday June 3, 2002 -- 10:46:02 pm
Hear Hear. I am all in favor of crust. Then again, I am the type of person that eats all the crust off first, bite by bite, then slowly eats away towards the middle till I have a perfectly round bite size sandwich, which is then slowly enjoyed. But that is just my idiosyncrasy.



FROM: Marcus Mackey
DATE: Tuesday June 4, 2002 -- 9:41:15 pm
Pro Crusted bread, Pro PB, Pro Strawberry Preserves (not just jelly, must have chunks of real fruit ::grunting:: and nope... no grape, grape is EVIL as is all other forms of preserves in my opinion); all separated for creation and consumption. Preferrably "Homemade" Preserves (to align with another Ping) by my Grandmother (up here) or aunt in Missouri.

And to do the "how I eat a PB&J" (take that Reese's!!), umm... same way I eat any sandwich. Only difference is you might have to do the proverbial "end-swap" to catch any drips (although if you are a master in the craft, you can prevent the drips I've found by the way you make the sandwich), or wipe up the missed drips with the sandwich before polishing it off.



FROM: Alan Gee
DATE: Wednesday June 5, 2002 -- 5:43:20 pm
Marcus- I agree the grape is EVIL



FROM: Joseph Long
DATE: Wednesday June 5, 2002 -- 6:19:46 pm
Purchasers of commercially de-crusted bread make all consumers look like dummies. You will not find support for commercially decrusted bread in my quarter.
What happens to the left over bread crumbs? I propose that this a simple scheme for Sara Lee to increase profits. Sara Lee, in her profit leaching corporate scheming has come up with a clever device that simultaneously dupes the one consumer into paying more for less of something and dupes another into paying for something that costs Sara Lee nothing to produce.
Viz. Step One: Sara Lee convinces the unwary consumer through clever that crustless bread in worth more--to the staggering tune of 75 cents per de-crusted loaf--that's a whole one-third more cost. What is the consumer left with? Less. She/he is left with less than a whole loaf of bread, and has paid more for it.
Step 2. Resell the unused crust to another party for even more profit. There are plenty of uses for pulverized bread crust--it can be sold to the hotdog industry as a "cereal filler," sold to meatloaf or meatball makers, or sold for some other use (bread crumbs are used in all kinds of things, and are valuable).
Now, instead of Sara Lee paying the costs of making bread, and pulverizing it into bread crumbs for sale, Sara Lee takes its bread stock from you, the purchaser of de-crusted bread, and charges you for it. She then turns around and sells it again!! From a profits gaining perspective it's beautiful!! It's brilliant!! But from a consumer standpoint it's the old hat-trick: pay more for less. In that regard, people who purchase de-crusted bread make all consumers look bad. They are suckers. If this crustless idea catches on, I'll be very mad.



FROM: Elizabeth [E-Mail]
DATE: Wednesday June 5, 2002 -- 11:18:29 pm
Soft bread already pales in comparison to crusty bread, and soft bread with no crust is not even worth eating. Any crusty bread fan should visit France for SURE. Soft-crusted bread is almost unheard of, and in fact some French people make fun of Americans for eating it.



FROM: Ryan
DATE: Thursday June 6, 2002 -- 9:36:41 am
She/he is left with less than a whole loaf of bread, and has paid more for it.

Yet another way that bread is like a bikini.



FROM: Mike B.
DATE: Thursday July 4, 2002 -- 12:06:29 pm
I don't mind bread crust, except that the ordinary run-of-the-mill white bread has crust that is really--dry but not crusty--with like a burned taste. I dunno. Bread is weird.



FROM: King Random
DATE: Sunday July 7, 2002 -- 10:04:18 pm
Sour dough is the best all around, in my opinion. Good bread, but the crust is the best part. What could be better? Only problem is, it is a bit expensive. Oh well, the price we must pay for good bread.



FROM: Blah
DATE: Saturday October 5, 2002 -- 5:32:08 pm
First of all I'm jus gunna come flat out and say CRUST STINKS. Let Sarah Lee come out with their 'no crust bread.' Not everyone is enjoys the crust on bread. I personally am going to support the manufacturing of no crust bread. There needs to be more of a variety of breads.



FROM: Karen
DATE: Thursday October 17, 2002 -- 9:15:19 pm
My husband and I are very confused. Where is most of the nutrition in bread? Is it in the crust or not?



FROM: Marcus Mackey
DATE: Friday October 18, 2002 -- 8:49:06 am
What we have here boys and girls, is a right-wing, conservative, anti-crust conspiracy.

Save the crust! Save the crust! Save the crust! ::chanting::

Did I mention it's good on pizza too. ;)



FROM: Robin
DATE: Saturday October 19, 2002 -- 2:01:45 pm
This right-wing conservative LOVES bread crust! You can't bake bread without it! :-P




FROM: Mike [E-Mail]
DATE: Wednesday October 29, 2003 -- 10:20:13 pm
Bread crust is makes the difference in my daily routine. It helps me a lot.



FROM: cameron [E-Mail]
DATE: Monday July 26, 2004 -- 5:51:26 pm
it's all about the sprouted grain bread! much healthier and tastier than that contentless, high fructose corn syrupy crap bread!



FROM: Jeleesa Holt [E-Mail]
DATE: Thursday December 2, 2004 -- 10:51:32 am
Sarah Lee's Bread tastes great looks wongerful and makes great toast. I LOVE IT!!!!!!!



FROM: Joseph
DATE: Thursday December 2, 2004 -- 1:58:25 pm
Jaleesa,

You just don't get it. Sara Lee takes full advantage of you, and here you are applauding. It would be bad enough if Sara Lee just charged the same for the crustless bread and then sold the crusts to other crust-using food conglomerates for additional profit, or used the crust themselves for breading their high fat, high sodium, high profit prepared foods. But no, simple thieving is not enough; in the name of the profit margin, the consumer must be raped !!!



FROM: Adolfo [E-Mail]
DATE: Saturday March 26, 2005 -- 2:20:46 pm
Hi, Introducing the CrustAway, it was invented by a kid in Kansas, patented and made in the USA and it's available on the web at http://www.crustaway.com.
It fulfills a real need in our homes. Face it, most kids hate the crust and you can either lie to them about the nutriitious content of browned dough, and force them to eat it. ....or Get the CrustAway and be happy forever more. No more peeling crust.

Crustless commercial bread is a failed idea because bread dries up even with the crust on. The only solution is to cut it right before you use it. The uncrustables from smuckers are a nice snack, however the molding and sealing, forms guess what? Hard compressed dough again. It just won't do. The CrusAway allows even a little kid to take the crust off by themselves. It leaves no hard edges, only soft spongy bread that kids love. And you can use the bread you're using already.

Love,
Adolfo
CrustAway.com



FROM: Paul
DATE: Saturday March 26, 2005 -- 6:35:55 pm
Aw come on, Adolfo - did you even read my Ping, or are you just here to pitch your product? At least put on a good show....



FROM: Joseph
DATE: Monday March 28, 2005 -- 4:59:51 pm
CrustAway will only work on certain bread, and, it looks like it promotes waste because it looks like it removes a lot of good bread with the unwanted crust. I don't get the feeling that this will work well on the loaf of Jewish rye, which is a shallow oval in cross-section. The Jewish rye has the most unpopular crust in the house among the uncrustables. For crust-eaters, the Jewish rye has the most delectable crust.



FROM: Marcus Mackey
DATE: Monday March 28, 2005 -- 6:24:42 pm
This right-wing conservative LOVES bread crust! You can't bake bread without it! :-P

Satire is a grave art lost to many who take offense to things too quickly without getting the amusement/punchline in what is being said.

(e.g. everything is a conspiracy nowadays ;-)).

I could've said that this was the Right-wing conservative response of Sara Lee's management to Liberal Democrat's intents on imposing a tax on crusted bread to help pay for rising fuel costs on the altern-a-minivans (read: SUV's) that many environmentalist soccer mom's drive en masse today. Of course, many Liberals would denote how this is a necessary evil because of the Right-wing oil barons extorting the masses for every ounce of earnings, all the while denouncing the successes and probabilities of alternative fuels and environmental concerns by the Conservatives.

It all boils down to perceived agendas (which both sides have), and a lot of lobbying on both sides about stupid petty crap without looking at the realities of both sides (most of which are crooks) and coming to somewhere in the middle to make any form of real progress on the REAL needs. That is if there is real progress to be made in politics in the modern age.

Then again... maybe this is all a byproduct of the pesky "Skull and Bones" being at it again?

::scratching chin::

::tongue in cheek::

::laughing::



Joseph...

People pay premiums on many things everyday. Sometimes without there being anything other than taking one piece away to make it more palatable for those who can do without. Minimalists will gladly pay higher for items that aren't as cumbersome, and have a style to them that comes from being spartan. The iPod Shuffle's success would be a good example of this in comparison to it's other Flash-based competition. With similar pricing and no screen, no radio, and just a simple click wheel and flip-switch... it's less = more. You could argue getting a similarly priced/sized San Disk or iRiver with a screen, AM/FM tuner, and more functionality is a better value... but with a myriad of tiny nearly unusable buttons, buttocks-ugly styling, a screen that's darn near impossible to read via the amount of data presented, and a user experience that's half as elegant as an iPod, iPod Mini, or even an iPod Shuffle... sometimes less is more.

While I myself wouldn't buy bread without the crust, those who wish to likely will get a product that suits them. More power to them, that's what makes capitalism great is supply/demand and the pursuit of filling niches with demand. With time = money, saving time having to cut off crust, and therefore being more wasteful in their own perception (rather than have Sara Lee do it for them at a premium but not having to feel wasteful, as they know nothing of the process, ignorance can be bliss)... is probably worth the $ spent in buying it premade crustless. Nothing is to say that they aren't making larger slices to cut the crust from, so you end up with a slice that is just as large, without the unwanted crust. I would assume that the R in R&D would find the need for this (similarly sized bread without the crust), and the D would come up with the solution to make it possible.



FROM: Joseph
DATE: Tuesday March 29, 2005 -- 7:51:33 pm
Marcus,

"Less is more" is more or less the lesson and the moral. But, I've never equated a crusted bread high on the complication scale as is a 21st century piece of hi-tech, hi-gloss, hi-cost, technonsense. For this reason, I find that my primary photographic equipment is not a new-fangled digital cam but a 1950s era rangefinder, that my TV has no cable and no TiVo and still picks up waves, that my car still has a carburetor, and that my music either comes from a radio or an odd big vinyl disc.

But, I have never come across a loaf of bread with wires, buttons, screens, jacks, keyboards, computer interfaces or anything else on it for that matter, except for maybe some seeds or raisins, which are not usually very complicated.

In short, while I do appreciate your point, I must insist that when it comes to bread, less is less, even if you pay more. And only those crusty types would demand more of my dough for less of their bread.



FROM: Irene Brosch
DATE: Sunday August 14, 2005 -- 5:48:46 pm
Often I do remove the crusts as a recipe specifies. I then put these crusts in the freezer to use at a later date. Do you know of any recipes calling for a generous amount of bread crusts?



FROM: Ryan [E-Mail]
DATE: Sunday August 14, 2005 -- 9:34:30 pm
Why not break them up, toast them lightly, and use them for croutons?



FROM: Patrick
DATE: Thursday October 27, 2005 -- 8:16:11 pm
If you call the outside of a loaf of bread the crust, what do you call the inside? Is there a name for the soft part? Email me if you know the answer.



FROM: Eddie Gnanapragasm
DATE: Wednesday November 16, 2005 -- 9:06:53 pm
im 22 years of age. this would save my dad time in the morning when he cuts the crust off for my work sanwiches.......great idea guys



FROM: Curly Hair\'d Crust Girl
DATE: Wednesday November 16, 2005 -- 9:16:42 pm
Wouldn't everybodies hair be straight if we didn't eat our crusts???



FROM: Josh
DATE: Friday April 21, 2006 -- 1:16:13 pm
michael mcconvile needs to eat his crust. he sits at the lunch table ever day, filling himself with "semi-sandwhiches." thats right. he eats everything but the crust. thus leading an unfulfilled life.



FROM: Mike McConville
DATE: Monday April 24, 2006 -- 10:06:30 pm
My ideal bread is a bread baked to golden brown perfection all around. That way, I could dive in through the top and eat it out.



FROM: mick
DATE: Monday April 24, 2006 -- 10:14:08 pm
umm....everyone who has ever posted something on this site is a raving lunatic and should be sent to a mental institute...crust is horrible..end of discussion...thats why it makes up 4% of the total surface area of the bread...anymore than four percent and the US population would never buy bread again...any product without crust has my support,, and i would like to say whoever wrote that initial article is clearly having an affair with a loaf of bread

mick



Terri February 19, 2007, 1:55 am

I have a 5 year old that will not eat bread with the crust. Where can I find this crustless bread? I have looked in every grocery store around my house.

you June 5, 2007, 10:54 pm

i only eat bread heels. that’s how pro-crust i am.

jedipocky August 11, 2007, 3:41 pm

i only eat the crusts of bread. strange eh? the white part is not worth my calories, tiem and stomach space.
bread crust rules… yumm. the brownness of it and the texture..thats the whole point of me eating bread!
send your crusts to me!

keiva December 13, 2007, 3:28 pm

i’m a mother of 3 and none of my kids like crust on there bread i hate cuting the edges of all there sandwiches i already have lots to do with my day i would be diffently buy that crustless bread …..as would all other mothers i think it’s a great idea an they could just market it for kids…..

What is this then?

The Daily Ping is the web's finest compendium of toilet information and Oreo™® research. Too much? Okay, okay, it's a daily opinion column written by two friends. Did we mention we've been doing this for over ten years? Tell me more!

Most Popular Pings

Last Week's Most Popular Pings

Let's be nice.

© 2000-2011 The Daily Ping, all rights reserved. Tilted sidebar note idea 'adapted' from Panic. Powered by the mighty WordPress.