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Women make wilk, big whop!

September 14th, 2002

Melk

A handy word for your own, personal usage:

melk (mehlk) n.: 1. Any spoiled or expired dairy product. i.e., That’s not milk, it’s melk. 2. Any item or object past its prime. i.e., Netscape 4.7 is a bunch of melk. [Attribution: Gregory Becker, 2000]

Posted in Food and Beverage

FROM: Robert [E-Mail]
DATE: Saturday September 14, 2002 -- 2:15:29 pm
My Chicago-born dad pronounces milk like "melk," as does an Ohio-born family friend.



FROM: Robert [E-Mail]
DATE: Saturday September 14, 2002 -- 2:15:59 pm
Also: "Don't drink the milk." "Why?" "It's spurled!"



FROM: MollyCule
DATE: Monday September 16, 2002 -- 6:07:08 am
My boyfriend and I are both from Ohio (our hometowns are about 45 minutes apart). I say it melk and he says milk. We just had a large conversation over this in the grocery store yesterday, actually, right before the Lucky Charms/Frosted Flakes debate.



FROM: Greg
DATE: Monday September 16, 2002 -- 10:21:55 am
Sometimes I don't check the expiration date on the gallon and I end up pouring melk on my cereal. Quite a frustrating experience.



FROM: Ryan
DATE: Monday September 16, 2002 -- 2:55:34 pm
Interestingly, soy milk can become soy melk, as well. It's quite chunky.



FROM: Mary
DATE: Saturday March 6, 2004 -- 9:03:49 pm
I'm from Wisconsin and I say melk. If I think about it I'll say milk.



FROM: Robert [E-Mail]
DATE: Sunday March 7, 2004 -- 7:00:20 pm
We just had a large conversation over this in the grocery store yesterday, actually, right before the Lucky Charms/Frosted Flakes debate.

I sincerely hope the Frosted Flakes side won.



FROM: Joseph
DATE: Thursday March 11, 2004 -- 11:44:00 am
I am originally from Ohio--Cleveland area. There was always a raging debate between kids who said "milk" and kids who said "melk." The funny thing is, the "melkers" usually couldn't hear that they weren't actually saying "melk." So then I would ask them to say "silk" and they sheepishly would say silk that rhymed with "milk." However, they and their ilk still refuse to admit that "melk" is not "milk." Obviously, people who say "melk" for "milk" are stupid and stubborn. These poor qualities become especially pronounced when a "melker" says "It's no use crying over spilled melk," and they don't even realize that spill and milk are supposed to contain the same vowel sound; they never say "It's no use crying over spelled melk."
If you use "melk" according to the above definition, and not instead of "milk," then that's okay because it's a different word.



FROM: Grant
DATE: Tuesday May 10, 2005 -- 3:30:35 pm
On the car ride home i had a large argument with some of my friends about the word melk. I don't know where i picked up the pronunciation but i find ist strange that my siblings say melk too but neither of my parents do.



FROM: Grant
DATE: Tuesday May 10, 2005 -- 3:30:35 pm
On the car ride home i had a large argument with some of my friends about the word melk. I don't know where i picked up the pronunciation but i find ist strange that my siblings say melk too but neither of my parents do.



EJ September 11, 2006, 8:53 pm

Maybe it’s a Cleveland-area thing. My Cleveland-raised parents and grandparents said “melk.” I did it until I got older, moved to another part of the country, and realized I was mispronouncing it.

Monique January 11, 2008, 10:31 pm

I’m from California [bay area] and I say melk. Everyone’s always made fun of me for it but it feels unnatural to say MILK. I have to think about it. I’m not going to be like “can you pass me the *MILK*” when it comes more naturally to say *MELK*. I have no idea where I picked this up.

Oliver April 26, 2008, 1:21 pm

I suspect you can trace the milk/melk thing back a long way. I live in Bristol, England. I don’t have a strong regional accent* but my friend does. I say Milk and she says melk.

* I mean not strong for here, that is you would probably say I do have a strong accent. However, you would be able to understand me, wheras my friend with the strong accent you would probably not understand. How can I describe this region’s accent? You know how pirates talk in the old films, well it’s pretty much like that. The reason being that alot of real pirates came from Bristol.

marissa February 14, 2009, 12:16 am

me and all of my friends have a huge fight about this so, i was looking it up to see what people say. i say ‘milk’ and some of my friends say ‘melk’ we live in New York. maybe it depends where you grow up.

Lynn July 18, 2010, 5:23 am

I grew up in New Jersey and then NW Ohio and never heard this. I now live in SE Michigan where I know a number of locals who say not only melk for milk, but eff for if. Other local phenomena include using the possessive for any company name, and adding “over” to the preposition “to” relating to travel. So instead of “if you go to Kmart, get some milk” you would have “eff you go over to Kmart’s, get some melk.” Also, “he works over to Ford’s.” I find it all fascinating.

Julian November 18, 2010, 9:01 am

Maybe I could shed some light on this:
Here in Norway we say Melk, many norwegians emigrated to the US, we probably brought it with us. But you’re lucky that they didn’t bring the other pronounciation we have: mjølk

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