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July 24th, 2001

The Address Bar Shortcut

It’s no secret that using your keyboard for commands is faster than switching over to your mouse. This is even true in Macland, even though the mouse is used moreso than on the PC.

I often use the shortcut to access the Address Bar whilst browsing the web. On IE5/PC, this was Alt-D. Nice, and almost logical, given that D is the second letter of the word "address". When I started using Opera 5 for more than simple tasks, I found that the address bar shortcut was F8. F8? I didn’t see any logic in that one. Nevertheless, both Alt-D and F8 were burned into my brain.

When I switched over to IE5/Mac, I found that occasionally something would pop up in my Favorites menu. I had no idea how things were getting there, until I realized something very simple: the "Add to Favorites" shortcut was Apple-D. Now, really… this is the same browser, just on a different platform, and you’re telling me you can’t standardize that? (Yes, yes, I know there are technical differences. But it’s still IE.)

So what’s the proper shortcut? It’s Apple-L, presumably for the L in URL. Fine. But now I have to reorient myself for each browser I use – and I haven’t even mentioned Netscape 6.1. I can’t imagine what would’ve happened if the X, C, and V keys weren’t standardized as Cut, Copy, and Paste.

So what key should we make the Address Bar shortcut? I say Control-D or Apple-D. But it could be Alt-Ctrl-U for all I care; let’s just pick something and stick with it. -pm

Posted in Technology

FROM: Terry M.
DATE: Tuesday July 24, 2001 -- 1:01:24AM
Here's a table I made a long time ago showing how different the keybinding is for as basic a command as PAGE-UP and PAGE-DOWN among very common Unix programs (and even different among the different modes of the same program in some cases). Note that this is for an extremely basic function which every program has, nothing anywhere approaching the complexity as the address bar shortcut.













Program Page Up Page Down
EMACS ALT-V CTRL-V
VI CTRL-B CTRL-F
SLRN headers CTRL-U CTRL-D
SLRN message B SPACE
PINE/PICO (editor) CTRL-Y CTRL-V
PINE (headers/message) - SPACE
ELM headers - or LEFT + or RIGHT
ELM message (not supported) SPACE
MORE B or CTRL-B SPACE or Z
LESS W, B, CRTL-B, or ALT-V Z, F, CTRL-F, CTRL-V, or SPACE




FROM: Aaron
DATE: Thursday July 26, 2001 -- 5:25:09AM
I can't imagine what would've happened if the X, C, and V keys weren't standardized as Cut, Copy, and Paste.

Come 'on Paul, everyone knows META-w is copy, CTRL-w is cut, and CTRL-y is paste.

In Opera on Linux, I usually use CTRL-n to get a new window, which also puts the cursor in the address bar. CTRL-w to close a window. I like the MDI interface in Opera, it's easy two switch among different pages; which is very useful when switching between two different documentation pages

Also in Opera, I use the CTRL-[up] and CTRL-[down] to navigate the links on a page. It can be a very fast way to navigate.





FROM: Aaron
DATE: Thursday July 26, 2001 -- 5:30:42AM
Terry,
All the emacsen I've used come with [PageUp] and [PageDown] bound to page up and down actions. But you can always set your own keybindings. Running Emacs on a Linux PC, I also map:
; My keybindings for PC keyboards
(global-set-key [home] 'beginning-of-line)
(global-set-key [end] 'end-of-line)
(global-set-key [C-prior] 'beginning-of-buffer)
(global-set-key [C-next] 'end-of-buffer)
(global-set-key [f1] 'save-buffer)
(global-set-key [f4] 'undo)
(global-set-key [f5] 'goto-line)
(global-set-key [f6] 'font-lock-fontify-buffer)



FROM:
DATE: Saturday January 1, 2005 -- 3:30:36 pm



FROM: Patrick van Logchem
DATE: Tuesday June 6, 2006 -- 4:44:42 pm
Maybe a bit late, but I found a solution to this problem:

If you open 'opera:config' (by typing that into the address bar of opera),
you can find a filepath under 'User Prefs', named 'Keyboard Configuration'.
When you open the specified file in a text-editor, you can alter the shortcuts for almost every function. In this case you'll probably want to change the 'Focus address field' shortcut to 'd alt'. You can find the definition for this action in de section '[Browser Window]'; so it looks like this:

[Browser Window]
d alt = Focus address field | Focus message list

This feature is available since Opera 7 at least, maybe earlier - I don't know.
Good luck anyways. Cheers!



FROM: Patrick van Logchem
DATE: Tuesday June 6, 2006 -- 4:44:59 pm
Maybe a bit late, but I found a solution to this problem:

If you open 'opera:config' (by typing that into the address bar of opera),
you can find a filepath under 'User Prefs', named 'Keyboard Configuration'.
When you open the specified file in a text-editor, you can alter the shortcuts for almost every function. In this case you'll probably want to change the 'Focus address field' shortcut to 'd alt'. You can find the definition for this action in de section '[Browser Window]'; so it looks like this:

[Browser Window]
d alt = Focus address field | Focus message list

This feature is available since Opera 7 at least, maybe earlier - I don't know.
Good luck anyways. Cheers!



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